Thursday, August 10, 2017

At Home

The word is out that we have relocated! We are in the midst of complete unpacking chaos over here, but I thought I would share a bit of the background story and all about our new home! When we first moved to Boston, we had 24 hours to find a place, so we decided that we would find a pretty spot to rent for a year and get to know the area before buying a home. We landed on the prettiest apartment/house rental (in Boston they have big old houses that are split into units) by the ocean/near downtown and loved living there........all the while knowing it was temporary. About a year ago we started seriously house hunting, and went to bazillions of open houses on the weekends (which quickly lost their fun factor after the second weekend), put in a few offers that got rejected (so discouraging), and had nearly given up when out current house popped up on the market. It checked off all of the big things on our list: good commute, good schools, high ceilings, a yard, some natural light.....and when we saw it in person we fell hard. As weird and hokey as it sounds, we felt "at home" the minute we pulled up to the open house. The charm of the house and the outdoor area were the biggest selling points for us. We didn't think we stood a chance since so many of our previous offers on other houses fell through, but long story short- we got the house!
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About the house: I don't think it's a coincidence that I have been reading about minimalism and have seriously paired down items in our home and closets. I think I saw the writing on the wall during all of those open houses- that if we were going to live in the areas we wanted to live, we would be getting a smaller house. In general, I would say the average Boston house is much smaller than those in other parts of the country (because they're old). Our house was built in 1905.....barely making the rule Connor made early on that whatever house we bought "had to be built no later than the 1900s" (that was after looking at a house built in the late 1700s). I can't say I blame him- while the charm is nice, we weren't looking for hidden repair costs. All that to say- we have a small house (1300 sq ft. to be exact) with lots of history.......a small cottage is what I'm calling it. There's storage and a small room in the basement that they don't factor into the square footage, and there's room to finish off the attic which is something we are hoping to do in the near future.  (Ps. Below is the only space not in disarray and also my favorite space- our sunroom!)
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If you have been following along for a few years, you will know that we had a cookie cutter house in Indianapolis (with 2800 sq. ft!) before moving to Boston. While I loved living there, I was not initially excited about the house. I knew it was a good investment, and that it made sense given we didn't think we would be in Indianapolis for long, but it did not get me excited at first. It was a very "mechanical" purchase if you will. We did make it our own and fall in love with it eventually, but that house was more of a process for me. This house was love at first sight for all of us, and having had both home buying experiences, I think my heart is just completely grateful for this one, since I know it's not usually the case. I was telling my mom that in our eleven years of marriage, I have always had one eye looking ahead to the next move, and this is the first time that there is no move in the near future (if there is one at all?).  I felt myself exhale a sigh of relief when we spent our first night here....."ahh home at last". Life brings it's fare share of highs and lows for everyone, and this moment will be filed under our "high", so thanks everyone for the well wishes.




Thursday, July 27, 2017

DIY Cement Planter

Ever since making that cement lamp earlier this year, I have been scheming of other things to make with my leftover bag of cement. If I had known how easy it is to work with (just add water!) , I would have been all over these projects a long time ago.  Between the lamp and the planter, there is hardly a dent in my $20 bag of cement, so prepare yourselves for a lot more DIY's coming your way. While it is messy, it's very simple to use. I'm starting to see things at the grocery store as molds for my cement rather than items for my pantry. (Send help!)
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1. I used a large cottage cheese container as the larger mold, and then placed a yogurt container inside to create the "hole" for the plant. Plastic molds are fine, cardboard molds are better, and stay away from metal molds (such as cans).
2. Then you just mix cement and water- it doesn't have to be perfect, I promise. Just make a "soup-like" texture, and then pour in the space between the two containers.
3. Make sure that the yogurt container is not pushed all the way down, so that there will be a cement bottom to your planter, and at the same time make sure it doesn't slide up. After about 10-15 min. the cement will start to settle.
4. I left mine on a shelf overnight and then it was completely hardened. I kept mine simple by painting a simple gold line around it.
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Thursday, July 20, 2017

On fashion

I do not claim to be the most fashion forward person by any stretch, but I do love the creativity I find there in expressing myself. I've always been a person that's selective with trends, and even "minimal" in the amount of clothes in my wardrobe by most standards. But there is always room for improvement, or as I discovered recently lots of improvement.  If you follow me on instagram, you may know that I've been reading "The Curated Closet" by Anuschka Rees. It's not a book simply about pairing down items in your closet, or even about a capsule wardrobe (though it mentions these things), it's a practical book......a workbook of sorts about discovering your style. There are pie charts, lists, and mood board "assignments" which I found SO helpful. I have always thought I was very in tune with my own style, but this book pointed out some key blinders in the area.
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One thing that stuck out to me was how Anuschka addressed the idea that with fashion we like to put ourselves and others in boxes with labels like "bohemian" or "preppy", when in fact most of us are unique individuals with a blend of many different styles. Through a series of questionnaires and lists, Anuschka helps you narrow down your personal fashion preferences. The other thing that I loved is that Anuschka addresses styling in a way that I have not seen before in a book. So you like button down shirts? How do you like them styled (a half tuck, whole tuck, no tuck, popped collar, not popped, rolled sleeves, with a cardigan....etc...)? The older I get, the less interested in trends I become, but more with feeling like the best version of myself. Ends up, I really feel most like myself in a monochromatic wardrobe.  I'm tabbing this look "french tomboy".
all sources can be found here

So combining reading "The Curated Closet" with reading Marie Kondo's "The Life Changing Magic of Tidying up", I've been going to war on my closet. Things with holes (embarrassingly quite a few items) got thrown away, things that didn't fit well, I didn't wear enough,  or didn't fit my style formula were given away or sold on eBay (still working on that). My closet and dresser are way more organized because there's less items I'm trying to squeeze into them, and while there are a few gaps in my wardrobe.....there's no more than before the purge. Perhaps this is because I had so many "filler" items (that I rarely wore) that are now gone, and  I'm just able to see the gaps more clearly. Does that make sense? I've compiled some of my favorite brands from over the years that I reach for again and again for their quality.

Zella- workout apparel, I always grab an item at the Nordstrom anniversary sale and I never regret it.
Natori- underwear/bras (again- the time to stock up is during the anniversary sale)
Eberjey- pajamas (these aren't cheap, but I've lived in the same pair for five years....so that counts for something)
Everlane- Tshirts/silk button down shirts
Cloth& Stone- Linen button down shirts
Madewell- denim (good quality for the price point)



Thursday, July 13, 2017

Faux Marble/Ikea Hack Dining Table- a year in review

It's been a little over a year since we first made our faux marble dining table, and I thought you guys might be interested in how it's held up.....the good and the bad.
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First, I would say that we are extremely happy with how it's held up in terms of everyday life wear and tear. The girls love art and and this is where they color crayons and paint, and all of those normal life messes come up easily. It also does't scratch easily. 
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The problem that we faced was early on. I had read that for any "holes" in the glaze coating we could just add clear nail polish. This was a huge mistake as it yellowed fairly quickly, and we have had yellow edges around our table for some time. We also had an issue with the edges of the table being sticky (it's difficult getting the glaze around this area) and I had read that rubbing alcohol would help- I decided to try nail polish remover (because it's what I had on hand), and this also was a big mistake. Rubbing alcohol would have worked beautifully for the sticky edges (and did in the end), but the nail polish remover made some more yellowing damage as well as removing some portions of the glaze. 
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While none of these areas of the table were obvious unless you studied the table, it still really bothered us. And considering the only issues we have had with the table were due to "DIY error" rather than the actual table not holding up, we decided to make another one and did so last weekend. Fifty dollars later, and I'm so glad we did! It looks beautiful, there's no yellowing, and it was fairly easy since we have done this whole thing once before.  Here's what the new table looks like in our dining room:

It's difficult to tell in pictures, but most people think it's a marble table that we purchased from Crate & Barrel. 



Thursday, June 29, 2017

DIY wooden Chargers

I almost hesitate to call this a DIY, because these chargers were SO easy to make.....almost too easy for a blog post. However if you're like me, it's the simple DIY projects that I'm drawn to. I made these a couple years ago for my parent's 60th birthday party.....I needed a lot of chargers, and if you've ever hosted an event and looked into purchasing chargers, you will know they can get really expensive. 
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So, we went to the hardware store, bought two wooden boards (each 5.25 inches wide), and cut them into 14 inch boards. After some light sanding (I wanted them to be rough, without worrying about anyone getting splinters over dinner), we stapled two of the 14 in boards together. The finished chargers measure 10.5 inches by 14 inches. I have used these chargers a ton in the past couple years, and they are a nice basic to have on hand.
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Here you can see the back where I (or Connor) simply stapled the boards together.....not pretty or super professional looking, but no one ever sees it, so who cares right?
Here you can see the charger more up close:
And again at our Thanksgiving table last year (just ignore that baby gate in the background)...

So easy and cheap, yet it delivers a beautiful finished product when the table is set....time to throw a party!
Wednesday, June 21, 2017

Calm

Even more important than diagnosing one's personal design style, is deciding how you want your home to make you feel.  In the past, I have dabbled in a few different design styles, but I have always striven to create a space that is calm and peaceful for my family. Restlessoasis, am I right? These spaces do just that for me:
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Tuesday, May 23, 2017

living simply, my ongoing journey

When I first set out to read a book a month this year, I did not have specific books in mind.....it sort of evolved as friends loaned me books they were reading or as my interest was peaked about certain books. But now that I'm nearly 6 months into the year, I can look back and easily detect a theme- less things, less on the calendar, less social media......just less of it all. I don't think it started with the books I've been reading, but with moving to an expensive area (supposedly only after after San Francisco and NY), living in a smaller space, and wanting to be intentional about what I bring into it. When we lived in Indiana, I was still very conservative with purchases by most standards, but I was not forced to think "where will this go?". We had a huge walk in closet that could have been the size of a small nursery or office, and 2800 sq feet. Thankfully we were aware that we would not live in that house long term and did not attempt to "fill it up" so to speak......Connor made our dining table and a book case for the office that were cheap and could be used outdoors some day down the road, and we were fine with having empty corners. Looking back though, I realize that I wasn't super intentional about the smaller purchases like the $20 variety from Target, or a shirt here and there. Now that we are in Boston, I can feel a shift in the air of how I want to live.
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So, what have I been reading around that theme? Present over Perfect by Shauna Niequist, Chasing Slow by Erin Loechner, Bread & Wine by Shauna Niequist, The Life-Chainging Magic of Tidying Up by Marie Kondo, and currently The Curated Closet by Anuschka Rees. If you were sitting in my living room I could go on and on about each one of these books (I loved them all for different reasons), but again, it also started before reading these books when we moved to Boston and we could not comfortably fit a lot of furniture in our home. We stored a few things that we loved (because we are renting and didn't want to sell everything), but a lot of furniture we sold- mostly things that I liked but didn't love ....even sentimental things. Each time we sold something it felt like a huge load was lifted off. As I started taking less trips to Target because I didn't want to spend money unnecessarily and didn't have any more space for things, I also started buying less "small" purchases online, and there was more time in my life because I wasn't running as many errands to return things. Life was made more simple because of this in a lot of ways. I don't think I realized  how much time those things took up until they were removed from my life. In her book Present over Perfect, Shauna Niequist talks about how the amount of time we spend "managing our stuff", whether it's cleaning and organizing those things or running errands to buy/return those things. This is something that really rang true to me as I looked back over the past year and saw how much more time was added to my life just by living simpler.

Here's the thing with minimalism and slow living....it's trendy right now. I have no desire to buy a tiny house, and I will probably not limit myself to a specific number of items in my closet, but I do think I am moving in the direction of a slower paced life and I think that there is something to be said about living that way. First and foremost, there's more time. More time with people you love, more time to do the things that you love. There's less time spent picking out what I'm going to wear for the day, because I have fewer items....I'm still in the process of doing this, but the idea is that what's left in my closet are only favorite items.
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I've been really torn with my feelings regarding instagram lately. Instagram tends to celebrate more.....the more beautiful clothes you have, the more exciting things that you do, and the more new things you buy oftentimes make for more beautiful and interesting instagram feeds. In fact, fashion bloggers have to showcase new material that is available for followers to purchase now (last year's shoes will not do) , so they have to constantly be purchasing (or be gifted) new clothes just to keep it all going. At least interior designers can use client's homes to show new material. As one who follows and has benefited from a number of fashion bloggers and  various creators, I'm not dismissing what they bring to the table, just seeking balance in my own life. I have started to be more intentional about which feeds I follow.....asking myself which ones are focused on celebrating life vs. ones that make me want more.  It's completely subjective, because the answers would vary from person to person, but these are questions I'm starting to ask myself.

Because it's trendy, I think there is a danger that being minimal can become the new standard for things. Such as, you are not living life well unless you live it this way. I don't agree with that message at all. First and foremost, I realize that I come from a place of privilege to even talk about living slower....I don't have to manage two jobs just to make ends meet. Men and women that do that to provide for their families have my utmost respect. The older I get, the more I realize how many different cultures and backgrounds people come from and I don't think being minimal necessarily benefits everyone, and it should never be a new standard for judging others. There are seasons of life where you are in survival mode (and depending on the girls and the amount of sleep I'm getting, I move in and out of that season), there are seasons when your schedule is full because it has to be (doctors appointments, illness, taking care of a loved one etc..), but for me slow living means that I don't over-schedule unnecessarily. I have close friends who live beautiful lives and are incredible mothers and are present with their families who would not be categorized as "minimalists" and I respect and admire them and love the lives that they lead. I don't even think my own life would be truly categorized as "minimalist" by a lot of people. I just realize that I am happier with less and when I live more simply my focus is not on accumulating more because it's focused on enjoying what I already have. For those of you who have hung in there for this whole thing, that's really what I'm getting at. I promise less words and more pictures next post...


Wednesday, May 10, 2017

Paint Splattered Napkins

Well, I was supposed to share these pretty napkins prior to Easter to use for an Easter table setting, but as is often the case with DIYs,  it was a total failure the first time around. I used fabric dye instead of fabric paint, thinking the results would be the same......but was I wrong. After ironing them and getting dye all over my ironing board cover and washing them and getting dye all over my washing machine....we had to throw them out because they looked so awful. It happens. Sometimes I think the lesson behind creating is to keep pressing on, past all the setbacks. Both times in creating these napkins, I let Reese help me. She loves creating as much as I do, and when possible I always try to include her in projects. It makes her so proud when she sees that item being used or on display in our home, and the process is always a special mom/daughter time with her. I will say, we had to do this while Charlie was asleep-otherwise it would have been a real disaster.
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We laid down a huge drop cloth and the napkins flat on top of it. I put a smock on Reese, and we both wore gloves. After filling a plastic cup with the fabric paint, I added water so that it was easier to "splatter".  
 We put our fingertips in the cup and after getting a small amount of paint, we "flicked" the paint off onto the napkins. At the start, I encouraged Reese to do small drops on the napkins only to find out that she liked the "big ones". Ha! She's always reminding me that she is her own artist, and I let her do her thing after that. Now that they are finished, I have to say that I kind of agree with her. 

What you'll need: disposable gloves, plastic cup, drop cloth, napkins (I used these), fabric paint


After letting them fully dry (24hrs), iron the backs of the napkins to set the paint. While maybe late for Easter, but I think these will be fun for summer dinner parties or outdoor entertaining.





Thursday, April 27, 2017

Blush & Green

We recently transitioned Charlie to a twin bed, and surprisingly (because it was only like what, 2.5 years ago with Reese?) we had forgotten what a complete transition that is......for everyone's sleep. Can you hear my panic? Maybe I'm imagining it, but I think we are slowly making progress. Anyways, one thing that helps me keep my mind off of the feeling of "what did we just do?!" is focusing on designing the girls bedroom without the crib. Recently, I've been drawn blush and green, whether it's a grey/green or a deep fern green.....I'm loving it all.
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Tuesday, April 11, 2017

Some News

Hey guys, I'm excited to share something that has been in the works for the past month.....I've joined the Homepolish design team here in Boston! I'm still going to be here on the blog, still taking e-design and in-person design clients, just adding Homepolish to the mix. Along those lines, I thought I would share one of my latest projects with you:
I love everything about this room, but for me the rug and the Kara Rosenlund art print really pull everything together. And If you have any projects you need help with I'd love to help- just shoot me an email. 










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Thursday, April 6, 2017

DIY Mussel Shell Place cards

As mentioned before, I'm hosting Easter this year! I couldn't be more excited to have my parents in town to experience Easter with the girls. Last summer and fall, the girls and I collected tons of mussel shells from the beach near our house, and have been gradually putting them to use. The natural blue ombre in mussel shells is so gorgeous, and I loved idea of incorporating them in our Easter tablescape. Using this pen, I created these pretty place cards for the table. As you can see in the bottom picture, due to the shine of the shell it is tricky to pick up the lettering on camera, but in person they are so so pretty.
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Though I plan on trading out the dried Eucalyptus for fresh greens/flowers, this is the general idea. I used one of my old scarves as a table runner, and there you go! Simple. 



Friday, March 17, 2017

5 Simple Table design tips for the person who would rather meal plan

When I found out I was hosting Easter this year, my first thoughts went to how I was going to design the table, not the menu. I know- so backwards for most people. While I love all aspects of hosting, the tablescape is definitely my favorite part. And though the most important part of hosting is enjoying your company, I do think a pretty table adds to the experience. I have found that people generally have one of two attitudes towards a beautiful table- the first is one of "oohs and ahh" and excitement to be a part of a special dinner, and the second is a roll of the eyes with a "who are you trying to impress" or a "too much work" sort of attitude. After some time feeling the need to apologize to the latter group for my love of beautiful design (including a pretty dinner table), I have come to embrace it. This is who I am, without trying to impress people, I just really love pretty dinners and it's my way of showing my guests how much I care for them. I also realize that designing a pretty table can be really intimidating for most people, so I thought I would break it down to the basics and dispel the rumor that a pretty table has to be an expensive one:
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1. White tablecloth. I think everyone should have at least one white tablecloth. I have a linen one (old from ikea) that I love and use again and again. Here's one for $12.

2. Greens and/or flowers. Trader Joes is your best friend if you have one near you, they have beautiful/cheap options. If you are on a tight budget, I would opt for greens over flowers......they make such a big impact, and you can use them in the place settings (like the picture above), as a centerpiece, or even draped around a chandelier/lighting. Most florists (even grocery florists) have them on hand even if they aren't displayed- just ask!


3. Something shiny. I prefer gold or brass candlesticks, but this could be vases, napkin rings, or chargers. Thrift stores or flea markets are a great place to find unique items for less, but etsy is also a great option. These are pretty. This past Christmas, I even spray painted a glass bottle gold- just get creative!


4. Versatile glasses. I personally think that stemless wineglasses are perfect. You can use them for wine or not, and they are simple enough for everyday use.


5. Cloth napkins. Ok, these can get pricey-but they don't have to! This is a cheap option, and I have these and use them often. If you are using a white tablecloth, different colored napkins are a good idea. I used my Ikea dishtowels for Thanksgiving this past year and they looked pretty. H&M Home has a great selection of table linens at an affordable price. Another idea for napkins, is to mix and match and accumulate a collection over time (see my collection below). Napkins can be styled a number of different ways- rolled up on the plate with a pretty ribbon or ring, folded under the plate, folded next to the plate, or made into a pretty shape on top of the plate. If it's stressing you out- choose something simple.





* I have white dishes and I do think their simplicity makes it easy to play around with many different tablescapes, but they aren't a necessity.





Friday, March 10, 2017

DIY Picture Hanging


I realize we aren't breaking any new ground with this wall hanging/frame, but for the $3 I spent, it's made a huge impact in our bedroom. You may remember that I made a similar frame for my in-laws when I designed their bedroom last winter. 
This is a great option if you don't want to spend the money on an expensive custom frame, or if you are in my situation and trying to hide something on your wall (old sconce wires left by a previous tenant) that is protruding out and a regular frame won't do (whether it's leaning against the wall or hanging on the wall). All you need?


- two small fish eye hooks
- staple gun
- two wooden pieces for framing (I got mine at Home depot and asked them to cut it for me there)
- twine for hanging

* We put the fish eye hooks in one wooden piece first (each equa-distant from the ends), and then stapled the picture to the back of the wooden pieces. The final step is to tie the twine between the fish eye hooks and then to hang the picture. The whole process took us about 15 minutes





Thursday, March 2, 2017

Currently Loving: White linen beds

It sounds crazy as I write this, but since we upgraded to a queen bed 5ish years ago (yes believe it or not we slept on a double for our first 6 years of marriage!), we have never had a headboard or bed frame. We've just used the cheap metal frame that came with the bed. It's not that I haven't wanted one, but something else always took priority.  It hasn't been until recently that I've really given it some thought. While I love so many bed frame styles, my heart has settled on a white linen bed with a slip cover headboard. I want something simple and modern, but not mid century (our bedroom already has a couple midcentury pieces). I also want to go with something casual and classic....something I won't grow tired of for years to come....and theres something about white linen that just does it for me. A slipcover that I could throw in the wash would be ideal. I'm still on the hunt for the exact bed frame (or maybe there's a DIY in my future?), but here are the images that have inspired me:
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Thursday, February 23, 2017

The Easiest Homemade Whole Grain Bread

It all started with me not loving the bread options at our local store- I wanted an option that didn't have a huge list of ingredients that I didn't recognize.  That coupled with the fact that the closest Trader Joes is a good distance from where I live, I ventured into making my own bread. I also love the idea of the girls growing up with their mom making bread- R really enjoys helping me mix the ingredients every week, and I hope it's a sweet memory for them as the get older. Since I wanted this to be a weekly thing, I was looking for a simple recipe- one that didn't feel overwhelming, even on bad weeks. What I stumbled upon is a recipe that literally requires me to only mix the ingredients with a spoon. Ideal. It tastes pretty incredible too! I double this recipe every week for the girls' sandwiches and Connor's toast in the morning. Now that I've been doing it for a few months, I'm thinking about trying a couple variations.
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1 1/2 cups of water
3/4 Tbsp  fast acting/instant yeast ( 1 packet or 2 1/4 tsp.)
2 Tbsp. honey
1/2 Tbsp. salt
2 cups whole wheat pastry flour (I use Bob's red mill)
1 3/4 cups unbleached all purpose flour

*Combine warm water (bath water temp), yeast, honey, salt, and flours in a mixing bowl & stir. Once combined, form into a ball and lift dough up and coat bowl with olive oil. Cover and let rise for 2hrs at room temp. (I put it in the oven) . Let rise another 2hrs in fridge (covered).  Knead dough roughly 20 turns and form into a loaf. Make three slats in bread and cover loosely with plastic wrap & let rise another 45 min. Preheat oven to 425 and bake for 28 min. Let it cool before you slice it!

*The original recipe can be found here.



Friday, February 17, 2017

What we're reading

Reading with my girls is one of my favorite times during the day. Everything comes to a standstill as they snuggle on my lap, often cheek-to-cheek, and we enter into a story together. To grow their collection, every birthday and christmas we give them at least one book. A couple years ago I started writing inscriptions on them, and I think it will be special in the years to come. For those of you struggling- I will say that I've been there! It wasn't until she was three, that R has been able to sit still long enough to get through one non-board book (let alone five) without squirming. I remember having to have snacks on hand and making it interactive (like adding in jumps and whatnot- I kid you not) to keep her interest. C was a different child, it seemed from the get go she had an interest in books, books are her happy place. She can usually be found with a book in hand as well as a pile beside her. Whatever personality your child has, I have found that through perseverance we have come to this happy place of really enjoying reading together. I thought I would share some of our favorite children' books with you.....these are books that the girls ask me to read again and again (the illustrations are pretty too). I'd love to here your favorites!

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Tuesday, January 31, 2017

Client: Newlyweds

I stumbled across this moodboard I made earlier this fall for a newlywed couple who hired me to design their bedroom. It was a really fun project melding together two very different design styles. She was very bohemian and feminine in her taste, being drawn to lace and curved lines, pinks and purples. He preferred very modern pieces with minimal decor. Tricky yes? To blend these two (seemingly) opposite styles, we kept the furniture streamlined and added a feminine rug and pillows with texture (blue for him to tone down the pink and purple in the rug). The result is a cozy room that  satisfied both parties.
Pillows- 1,2,3 (most of these are no longer available-sorry)
Blanket
Swing Lamp
Marble Tray
Table Mirror
Rug
Side Table
Dresser
Bed




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Wednesday, January 25, 2017

DIY Modern Cement Lamp

As mentioned in last week's post, this year I'm hoping to do a monthly DIY series dedicated to the idea that good design doesn't have to come with a hefty price tag. First up? This cool modern lamp I made for $20 ($5 for the bulb, $12 for the light kit, and $20 for a 50lb bag of concrete mix that I plan on using for other projects.... if you count only the amount of cement I used for this project, the total would come to around $20). Inspiration struck when I saw a similar lamp while perusing a design site one day and thought "I could make that.".....not to mention, I've been wanting to work with concrete for a while now.
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Here are my supplies, I bought a 660 Lumens 60W bulb (basically the largest round bulb I could find at Home Depot), this light kit, a bag of concrete mix (I used Rapid Set Cement All), and a cardboard mold for the concrete. If I had to do it over again, I would choose a PLASTIC mold. We were able to cut off the cardboard with a knife, but plastic would have been much easier.
 Next, I cut a hole in the lid of my container and fed the light kit cord through the hole. I used the lid on the bottom of the container, and taped around the hole the cord came through so that no concrete would come through when I poured it. 
 Next I placed tape over the top of the light kit to protect it from concrete.
 I put the whole thing into a larger container for any concrete that got out. Now, the directions to the concrete package said something vague like "add water" and that adding more water meant "less firm concrete". The first batch of concrete I mixed was "soupy"  (seen below), and that worked fine, when I needed more concrete for my mold, I made it thicker and that worked fine as well.....so don't stress about the consistency too much. Now the concrete will set fast, so you will need to work quickly, but you do have a minute or so to maneuver things and get them just the way you want. I held the light fixture while Connor poured the concrete in the cracks, and then with my finger I made sure it was level.
I let it dry, and in a couple of hours- I had a lamp! If you are intimidated by working with concrete (like I was), don't be. While dusty, it's super easy and very satisfying. I'm already scheming about what to make next with that huge bag sitting in my garage. 
I love it paired with my modern night stand, but I also love the idea of it being paired with an antique piece.